Tag Archives: discipline

Radical

This book by David Platt has created much chatter in the Christian subculture.  He was supposed to have some extreme views of Jesus’ teachings.  Having read books such as Juan Carlos Ortiz’s book Disciple, I was pretty sure I wouldn’t be startled by anything Platt had to say.  I was wrong.

Here’s just a sample of  things that stung me:

  • Everything in all creation obeys God except humans.
  • USA Christianity has reduced being a good Christian to not doing a list of things.  Godliness, however, is determined by what I do.
  • I must say “Yes” to the words of Jesus before I hear them.  Otherwise I’ll never truly hear them.

But what really threw me for a loop was the fact that some of the people at Platt’s church actually try to live this way.  Imagine that – church goers whose lives show that God is more important than the American Dream.  Not only that, but Platt dared to give five points of action for me, the reader.  I plan to alter my 2012 to accommodate those five actions, with some modifications, and I’m eager to identify the results.

My notes on this book can be downloaded in MS Word format from the blue “FILES box” in the left side-bar of this blog.

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The Christian Atheist

The Christian Atheist by Craig Groeschel

A friend was so impressed with this book that he bought several of us the book, and we discussed it over a period of weeks.  It was well worth the time.

The book is practical (Surround yourself with people who have faith – encouragers.), comforting (God is love; he can’t help but love you.), and challenging (Worry is the opposite of faith.  Worry is sin.)  It is an excellent book for group discussion because it covers areas that commonly challenge followers of Jesus: guilt, injustice, money, shame, and forgiveness to name a few.

It also speaks at a level appropriate for all believers making it easy to understand and apply.

My notes on this book can be downloaded in MS Word format from the blue “FILES box” in the left side-bar of this blog.

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What Will I Do? part 1

Just recently I have come to realize that this simple sentence contains four important questions.

What will I do?  Knowing the what seems to be more important than ever.  So many choices lie before me.  In fact, the options seem to multiply the more I explore.  But I’m learning that sometimes there isn’t a perfect what.   It seems that every what has some risks as well as rewards.  Some negatives as well as some positives.  I will never be able to state with any confidence that I know the outcome of my choice.  And of course my current choice of what may only be a stepping stone to what is next.

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What Will I Do? part 2

What will I do?   The question doesn’t ask what I want to do.  Honestly, what I want to do is sometimes selfish, worthless, indulgent, shortsighted, or even illegal.  It doesn’t ask what I like to do.  It doesn’t ask what I promise, intend, or even what I should do.  It asks what I will do.  It’s asking what am I going to start and finish.  My life is littered with projects started but poorly finished, if finished at all.  This question exposes my will power.  What will I do?  Come challenges or obstacles or opposition, what will I do?

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What Will I Do? part 3

I usually fail to connect the following two sentences into one thought.  

Somebody should do something.  I am somebody. 

What will I do?  The question doesn’t ask me what the government will do.  It doesn’t ask what the church will do.  It doesn’t even ask what my neighbor  will do.  Somehow I have convinced myself that “they”, whoever that may be, should do something, but I am not the one to do it.  I have exempted myself.  But this question won’t let me step aside.  It pushes me to the edge until I cry,  “Okay, I will do something!”  I am accountable for me, and my sins of inaction outweigh my sins of action.  Besides, what I will do may prompt others to action.  My model of action may prove more important than my actual action.

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